Friday, January 22, 2016

Kali Linux 2.0 Tutorials: ByPass AV - Hack Windows (7/8/8.1/10)

How To Bypass Anti-virus and Hack Windows (7/8/8.1/10) Computers:

How to hack windows computers and bypass av using kali linux 2.0 with armitage cobalt strike and unicorn

Today In K4linux We will show you how to  ByPass AV with Unicorn and Hack Windows (7/8/8.1/10) using Armitage and Cobalt Sttrike on Kali Linux 2.0 (Kali Sana).

Disclaimer: This tutorial is for educational purposes only and we are NOT responsible in any way for how this information is used, use it at your own risk.

Whats is Unicorn ?

From the officiel Description Magic Unicorn is a simple tool for using a PowerShell downgrade attack and inject shellcode straight into memory. Based on Matthew Graeber's powershell attacks and the powershell bypass technique presented by David Kennedy (TrustedSec) and Josh Kelly at Defcon 18.

Usage is simple, just run Magic Unicorn (ensure Metasploit is installed and in the right path) and magic unicorn will automatically generate a powershell command that you need to simply cut and paste the powershell code into a command line window or through a payload delivery system.
 root@k4linux:~# python unicorn.py
Download Unicorn from :  http://goo.gl/hZjAgC

In this tutorial we will use also a script to compile from c to executable, you can download it from : http://goo.gl/i4yikx

Command you will use in this Tutorial:

You need to install mingw32:
root@k4linux:~# apt-get install mingw32
The command you need to use to compile from c to executable:
root@k4linux:~# i586-mingw32msvc-gcc  clean.c -o clean.exe -lws2_32

How To Bypass Common AV and Hacking Win Computer?

All the steps for this tutorial are explained on a Video on our Youtube Channel you can subscribe to it by this link they are many other tutorials that you can learn about bypassing and hacking and others basics tutorials about kali linux 2.0 (Kali Sana).

In this video tutorial we explain to you how to use Armitage and also Cobalt Strike to Hack Windows 7/8/8.1/10




If you have encountered a problem or you have any questions or remarks please feel free to set a comment.


Thursday, November 26, 2015

Kali linux 2.0 Tutorials: How To Install Veil-Evasion:

How To Install Veil-Evasion on Kali Linux 2.0 (Kali Sana):

k4linux kali linux 2.0 veil evasion


Veil Evasion is a part of the Veil super project Veil-Framework which we recommend most users clone and install.
Veil-Evasion is a tool to generate Metasploit payload executables that bypass common antivirus solutions.

Disclaimer: This tutorial is for educational purposes only and we are NOT responsible in any way for how this information is used, use it at your own risk.
 
Veil-Evasion was designed to run on Kali Linux, but should function on any system capable of executing python scripts. Simply call Veil-Evasion from the command line, and follow the menu to generate a payload. Upon creating the payload, Veil-Evasion will ask if you would like the payload file to be converted into an executable by Pyinstaller or Py2Exe.

In our next Article we'll show you How To add veil Evasion to armitage and Bypass common Antivirus "With Veil Evasion" to Hack All Windows Versions (7/8/8.1/10) our fans on K4linux youtube channel have already seen the tutorial, if you want to join to them just subscribe to receive all our new tutorials.

How To Download Veil Evasion ?

To Download Veil Evasion Use The Follow Commands :

Install git : 
sudo apt-get -y install git

Download Veil Evasion with git command : 
git clone https://github.com/Veil-Framework/Veil-Evasion.git

Move Veil Evasion To /OPT folder : (Optional)
mv Veil-Evasion /opt

How To Install Veil Evasion ?

Go To Veil Evasion Folder :
cd /opt/Veil-Evasion/

Run The Setup Shell To install Veil:
bash setup/setup.sh -s


Watch the video tutorial for more explanation:



If you have encountered a problem or you have any questions or remarks please feel free to set a comment.



Source : Veil-Evasion, Veil Framework.

Monday, November 16, 2015

Kali Linux 2.0 Tutorials : How To Install Java :

How To Install Java on Kali Linux 2.0 Kali Sana:

 

Why download Java SE SDK?

From the Officiel web page Java technology allows you to work and play in a secure computing environment. Upgrading to the latest Java version improves the security of your system, as older versions do not include the latest security updates.

Java allows you to play online games, chat with people around the world, calculate your mortgage interest, and view images in 3D, just to name a few.

On Kali Linux 2.0 we need Java fore many softwars and tools, Like : Android-Sdk, I2P ... and more

Download latest Java SE SDK :

To Download Java Select the file according to your operating system from the list.
Download Link : http://www.java.com/en/download/linux_manual.jsp
Java will be saved on Downloads/ folder or save it on /root.

Uncompress archive:
root@k4linux:~# tar -zxvf jre*.tar.gz
Move the extracted folder to /opt:
root@k4linux:~# mv jre* /opt
And go to the folder :
root@k4linux:~# cd /opt/jre*

Install and register binaries Of Java :


This step registers the downloaded version of Java as an alternative,
and switches it to be used as the default:
update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/java java /opt/jre*/bin/java 1
update-alternatives --install /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libjavaplugin.s­o mozilla-javaplugin.so /opt/jre*/lib/amd64/libnpjp2.so 1
update-alternatives --set java /opt/jre*/bin/java
update-alternatives --set javac /opt/jre*/bin/javac
update-alternatives --set mozilla-javaplugin.so /opt/jre*/lib/amd64/libnpjp2.so

Testing your installation OF Java on Kali Linux 2.0:

To check the browser plugin, restart your webrowser, and click “Do I have Java?
To check the version of Java you are now running:
root@k4linux:~# java -version
java version "1.8.0_60"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_60-b27)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.60-b23, mixed mode)

Watch the video tutorial for more explanation :


If you have encountered a problem or you have any questions or remarks please feel free to set a comment.

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Kali Linux Tutorials 2.0 : Dos Attack using GoldenEye:

How To Dos Attack using GoldenEye on Kali Linux 2.0 Kali Sana :


kali linux 2.0 ddos attack

Today in k4linux.com we going to talk about how to use GoldenEye to perform a ddos attack, if you want learn about ddos attack you just need to read the article  about what is a Ddos Attack?
In this tutorial we will use GoldenEye.
 
Disclaimer:
This tutorial is for educational purposes only and we are NOT responsible in any way for how this information is used, use it at your own risk. 

What is GoldenEye ?


GoldenEye is an python app for SECURITY TESTING PURPOSES ONLY! And he is a HTTP DoS Test Tool.

 Dowloading GoldenEye :


To Download GoldenEye Go To : https://github.com/jseidl/GoldenEye
Ore open your Terminal on KAli Linux 2.0 and follow:
root@k4linux:~# git clone https://github.com/jseidl/GoldenEye.git
Cloning into 'GoldenEye'...
remote: Counting objects: 70, done.
remote: Total 70 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0), pack-reused 70
Unpacking objects: 100% (70/70), done.
Checking connectivity... done.
root@k4linux:~# cd GoldenEye/
root@k4linux:~/GoldenEye# ls
goldeneye.py  README.md  res  util
root@k4linux:~/GoldenEye#


How To Use GoldenEye :


GoldenEye it simple to use after downloading it go to the folder where you saved them.
Change the permission and make it executable :
root@k4linux:~/GoldenEye# chmod +x goldeneye.py
 And run the script :
 root@k4linux:~/GoldenEye# ./goldeneye.py [OPTIONS]
 To show all options :
 root@k4linux:~/GoldenEye# ./goldeneye.py -h

 Watch the video tutorial for more explanation (GoldenEye):







If you have encountered a problem or you have any questions or remarks please feel free to set a comment.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Kali Linux 2.0 Tutorials : How to install and configure Tor with Proxychains

Install And Configure Tor Project with Proxychains :


kali linux 2.0 tutorials tor project kali sana


Today In K4linux We will show you how to install and configure Tor with Proxychains on Kali Linux 2.0  (Kali Sana).

For first Tor isn’t the perfect anonymity and privacy solution. It has several important limitations and risks, which you should be aware of if you’re going to use it. We suggest to you to use VPN it's more secure.

How To install Tor :

To Install tor project in kali linux 2.0 you just need a simple line off command, open your terminal and type:
root@kali:~# apt-get install tor
and to start tor project, type in your terminal :
root@kali:~# service tor start

What is Proxychains ?


Proxychains - a tool that forces any TCP connection made by any given application to follow through proxy like TOR or any other SOCKS4, SOCKS5 or HTTP(S) proxy.
Supported auth-types: "user/pass" for SOCKS4/5, "basic" for HTTP.
proxyresolv - DNS resolving. Used to resolve host names via proxy or TOR.

When to use it ? What for ? Why ?

When you want two (or more) different proxies in chain:
like:
your_host <--> proxy 1 (TOR) <--> proxy 2 (HTTP or SOCKS4/5) <--> target_host

You may need it when the only way out from your LAN is through proxy server.
Or to get out from behind restrictive firewall that filters some ports in outgoing traffic.
And you want to do that with some app like telnet. Indeed you can even access your home LAN from outside via reverse proxy if you set it. Use external DNS from behind any proxy/firewall. Use TOR network with SSH and friends.

Source : Proxychains HowTo

How to Configure Tor with Proxychains :

To Configure Tor with proxy chains we gonne edit the proxychains.conf file.
root@kali:~# nano /etc/proxychains.conf
or
root@kali:~# gedit /etc/proxychains.conf


With this file open, uncomment out the "dynamic_chains" line. This will enable dynamic chaining of our proxies allowing for greater anonymity and trouble-free hacking.

kali linux 2.0 proxychains kali sana

To get proxychains to use intermediary proxies, we simply need to add the IP addresses of the proxies we want to use here.

kali linux 2.0 tutorials proxychains tor kali sana

How To Use Proxychains :


Fore example we gonna use proxychains in nmap scan :
root@kali:~# proxychains nmap -sS 74.125.232.135

kali linux 2.0 nmap proxychains hack k4linux


Watch the video tutorial for more explanation :


If you have encountered a problem or you have any questions or remarks please feel free to set a comment.


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Kali Linux 2.0 Tutorials : How to add a Non-root User

How To Add a Non Root User to Kali Linux 2.0 Kali Sana :


add non root user kali linux 2.0 tutorials

If You're Not Comfortable Running Kali Linux 2.0 (Kali Sana) as root adding a non-root user  is trivial and can be done by simply issuing commands similar to the following.
We gonna add a new username called K4linux, just change the "K4linux" username to your own.

To add new user, Open your terminal and type :

Kali Linux 2.0 Kali Sana tutorials add user
root@kali:~# useradd -m k4linux -G sudo -s /bin/bash

Chose a password for the new username : 

Kali Linux 2.0 Kali Sana add user

root@kali:~# passwd k4linux
Enter new UNIX password:
Retype new UNIX password:
passwd: password updated successfully
root@kali:~#
If you have encountered a problem or you have any questions or remarks please feel free to set a comment.

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Thursday, September 3, 2015

Kali Linux 2.0 Tutorials : How To Install and configure Conky

How To Install Conky on Kali Linux 2.0 (Kali Sana) :


Kali Linux 2.0 install and config conky
Conky is a system monitor for X originally based on the torsmo code.
This guide will step you through initial installation and configuration of Conky for Kali Linux 2.0 (Kali Sana).

Installing Conky :

apt-get install conky-all
apt-get install conky-manager

Configure Conky :

Edit conky config:
gedit /etc/conky/conky.conf


Select all the text and replace it with :
   ################################
    ##     Visit : K4Linux.coM                    
    ##                                             
    ##      Like : fb.com/K4linux  
    ##                                     
    ##                                     
    ##        Follow : Twitter.com/k4linux   
    ##                                                                       
    ################################

    background yes
    use_xft yes
    xftalpha 0.6
    own_window true
    own_window_type desktop
    own_window_argb_visual true
    # 0 = transparent, 255 = solid
    own_window_argb_value 160
    double_buffer yes
    update_interval 1
    maximum_width 200
    alignment top_right
    gap_x 10
    gap_y 10
    no_buffers yes
    uppercase no
    cpu_avg_samples 5
    net_avg_samples 5
    diskio_avg_samples 5
    if_up_strictness address
    draw_shades no
    draw_outline no
    draw_borders no
    draw_graph_borders no
    default_color lightgray
    default_shade_color red
    default_outline_color green
    short_units true
    use_spacer none
    xftfont DejaVu Sans Mono:size=10
    template0 ${font Open Sans:Bold:size=10}${color dodgerblue3}\1 ${hr 2}$color${font}${voffset 1}
    template1 \1 ${alignr\ 80}${fs_bar\ \1}
    template2 ${\1 name \2}${alignr}${\1 \3 \2} %
    template3 ${if_up \1}${template0 \2}\ndown $alignr ${downspeed \1}/s\nup $alignr ${upspeed \1}/s\ntotal down$alignr${totaldown \1}\ntotal up $alignr${totalup \1}$endif
    #${execi 30 sudo hddtemp /dev/sda | grep '/dev/sda:' | cut -c28-29}°C

    TEXT
    $color${font}${font Open Sans:size=44}$alignr${time %H:%M}$font$color${font Open Sans:size=15}
    $alignr${time %a}, ${time %d %b %Y}$font$color

    # SYS
    ${template0 SYSTEM}
    Kernel $alignr $kernel
    Uptime $alignr $uptime
    Temprature $alignr ${acpitemp}°C
   
    # CPU
    ${template0 CPU}
    $color${font}Intel i5 2500k $alignr $cpu %
    ${cpugraph}
    # RAM
    ${template0 RAM}
    In use $alignr $mem
    Used$alignr$memeasyfree
    Buffers $alignr $buffers
    Cache $alignr $cached
    # NETWORK
    ${template3 eth0 ETH0}${template3 wlan0 WLAN0}
    # TOP
    ${template0 TOP}
    $color${font Open Sans:bold:size=8}CPU$font
    ${template2 top 1 cpu}
    ${template2 top 2 cpu}
    ${template2 top 3 cpu}${voffset 5}
    $color${font Open Sans:bold:size=8}RAM$font
    ${template2 top_mem 1 mem}
    ${template2 top_mem 2 mem}
    ${template2 top_mem 3 mem}
    # HDD
    ${template0 HDD}
    ${template1 /}
    ${template1 /boot}
    ${template1 /var}
    ${template1 /usr}
    ${template1 /home}
    ${template1 /mnt/data}
    $color${font Open Sans:bold:size=8}/dev/sda $font$alignr ${hddtemp /dev/sda}°C
    ${diskiograph sda}
Or use the same configuration that you see in our videos tutorials :

#######################
# Config for Conky By K4linux
#
########################

########################
alignment top_left
gap_x 1930
gap_y 50
maximum_width 320
minimum_size 1280 50

# General
update_interval 2.0
double_buffer yes
draw_outline no
border_width 0
default_bar_size 0 5

# Window
own_window yes
own_window_type normal
own_window_argb_visual yes
own_window_colour 000000
own_window_transparent yes
own_window_hints undecorated below sticky skip_taskbar skip_pager

# Specific settings
cpu_avg_samples 2
net_avg_samples 2
no_buffers yes

# Output
use_spacer none
use_xft yes
xftfont Terminus:pixelsize=12
draw_shades no
uppercase no

# Colors (1 = Text; 2 = Data; 3 = heading)
color1 AAAAAA
color2 FFFFFF
color3 999999
color4 1793D0
color5 0050BF

# Templates (1 = Simple; 3 = Filesystem; 4 = Filesystem 2; 5 = Heading; 6 = Core temperature; 7 = Cpu load)
template1 ${color1}\1 ${color2}\2
template2 ${color1}\1 ${color2}\2/\3 (\4%)
template3 ${color1}\1: ${color2}${fs_used \1}/${fs_size \1} (${fs_used_perc \1}%) ${fs_bar \1}
template4 ${color1}\1: ${color2}$alignr${fs_free \1} ${fs_bar 5,120 \1}
template5 ${font Neuropolitical:bold:size=8}${color4}\1 ${font}${hr 2}
#template6 (core max_temp) e.g. (${template6 'Core\ 0' 60}
template6 ${execi 2 sensors | grep -A 0 \1 | cut -c18-19}${goto 100}${if_match ${execi 2 sensors | grep -A 0 \1 | cut -c18-21}<\2}${color}${execibar 2 sensors | grep -A 0 \1 | cut -c18-19}${endif}${if_match ${execi 2 sensors | grep -A 0 \1 | cut -c18-21}>=\2}${color red}${execibar 2 sensors | grep -A 0 \1 | cut -c18-19}${color}${endif}${goto 96}${color white} ${execbar echo 0}${color}
#template7 (cpu_no max_temp) e.g. (${template6 cpu1 60}
template7 ${cpu \1}${goto 100}${if_match ${cpu \1}<\2}${cpubar \1}${endif}${if_match ${cpu \1}>=\2}${color5}${cpubar \1}${color}${endif}${color}${goto 1}${color white}${goto 100}${execbar echo 0}${color}


#####################################
# Output
TEXT
${image ~/conky/arch_logo_48.png -s 35x35} ${font Neuropolitical:pixelsize=25}${alignr}K4${color #1793d0}linux
${voffset -10}${goto 50}${color2}${font Neuropolitical:size=6}A simple, lightweight distribution
${alignc}${offset -30}${color2}${font Neuropolitical:pixelsize=48}${time %H:%M}${font}
${alignc}${color  white}${font Neuropolitical:pixelsize=11}${time %A %d %B %Y}${font}

${template5 SYSTEM\ INFORMATION}
${color1}Hostname: ${color2}$nodename \
 | ${color1}Kernel: ${color2}$kernel
${color1}Time: ${color2}${time %Y-%m-%d %H:%M} \
 | ${color1}Uptime: ${color2}$uptime_short

${template5 CPU\ AND\ PROCESSES}
${color1}Usage: ${color2}${cpu}% \
 | ${color1}Freq: ${color2}$freq_g GHz \
| ${color1}Load: ${color2}$loadavg
Cpu  1(%): ${template7 cpu1 99}
Cpu  2(%): ${template7 cpu2 99}
Cpu  3(%): ${template7 cpu3 99}
Cpu  4(%): ${template7 cpu4 99}
Cpu  5(%): ${template7 cpu5 99}
Cpu  6(%): ${template7 cpu6 99}
Cpu  7(%): ${template7 cpu7 99}
Cpu  8(%): ${template7 cpu8 99}

Core 0(${iconv_start UTF-8 ISO_8859-1}°${iconv_stop}C): ${template6 'Core\ 0' 60}
Core 1(${iconv_start UTF-8 ISO_8859-1}°${iconv_stop}C): ${template6 'Core\ 1' 60}
Core 2(${iconv_start UTF-8 ISO_8859-1}°${iconv_stop}C): ${template6 'Core\ 2' 60}
Core 3(${iconv_start UTF-8 ISO_8859-1}°${iconv_stop}C): ${template6 'Core\ 3' 60}

${color1}Processes: ${color2}$processes \
 | ${color1}Running: ${color2}$running_processes
${color white}NAME${alignr}${offset -70}PID${alignr}${offset -38}CPU${alignr}MEM
${color #FFFFFF}${top name 1}${alignr}${offset -40}${top pid 1}${alignr}${offset -20}${top cpu 1}  ${alignr}${top mem 1}
${color #EFEFEF}${top name 2}${alignr}${offset -40}${top pid 2}${alignr}${offset -20}${top cpu 2}  ${alignr}${top mem 2}
${color #DFDFDF}${top name 3}${alignr}${offset -40}${top pid 3}${alignr}${offset -20}${top cpu 3}  ${alignr}${top mem 3}
${color #CFCFCF}${top name 4}${alignr}${offset -40}${top pid 4}${alignr}${offset -20}${top cpu 4}  ${alignr}${top mem 4}
${color #BFBFBF}${top name 5}${alignr}${offset -40}${top pid 5}${alignr}${offset -20}${top cpu 5}  ${alignr}${top mem 5}

${template5 MEMORY\ AND\ SWAP}
${color1}RAM:  ${color2}$mem/$memmax ($memperc%)
${if_match $memperc <85 5="" endif="" goto="" if_match="" membar="" memperc="">=85}${goto 5}${color red}${membar 5}${color}${endif}${goto 5}${execbar echo 0}
${color1}SWAP: ${color2}$swap/$swapmax ($swapperc%)
${swapbar 5}

${template5 NETWORK}
${if_gw}\
${template1 Network: Online}
${template1 DGW: $gw_ip\ ($gw_iface)} \
| ${template1 Nameserver: $nameserver}
\
${if_up usb0}
${color1}Interface:${color2} usb0 \
| ${color1}IP-Address:${color2} ${addr usb0}
${color1}Speed:${color2} Down: ${downspeedf usb0} / Up: ${upspeedf usb0}
${downspeedgraph usb0 20,150 000000 FFFFFF} ${alignr}${color #CFCFCF}\
${upspeedgraph usb0 20,150 000000 CFCFCF}
${endif}\
\
${if_up br0}
${color1}Interface:${color2} br0 \
| ${color1}IP-Address:${color2} ${addr br0}
${color1}Speed:${color2} Down: ${downspeedf br0} / Up: ${upspeedf br0}
${downspeedgraph br0 20,150 000000 FFFFFF} ${alignr}${color #CFCFCF}\
${upspeedgraph br0 20,150 000000 CFCFCF}
${endif}\
\
${if_up wlan0}
${template1 Interface: wlan0} \
| ${color1}IP-Address:${color2} ${addr wlan0}
${color1}ESSID:${color2} ${wireless_essid wlan0} \
| ${color1}Quality:${color2} ${wireless_link_qual_perc wlan0}%
${color1}Speed:${color2} Down: ${downspeedf wlan0} / Up: ${upspeedf wlan0}
${downspeedgraph wlan0 20,150 000000 FFFFFF} ${alignr}${color #CFCFCF}\
${upspeedgraph wlan0 20,150 000000 CFCFCF}
${endif} \
${else}\
${template1 Network: Offline}
${endif}

${font Neuropolitical:bold:size=8}${color4}${exec nvidia-smi -a | grep Product\ Name | awk -F':' '{$2=substr($2,2,length($2)); print $2}'}${font} ${hr 2}${color}
 Driver Version: ${color2}${exec nvidia-settings -query NvidiaDriverVersion | grep v-arch | awk '{print $4}'}${color3}
 Freq ${color2}${execi 10 nvidia-settings -query GPUCurrentClockFreqs | grep v-arch | awk -F':' 'NR==1{ print $3}' | awk -F',' '{$1=substr($1,2,length($1)); print $1}'} Mhz ${color3}@ \
 ${color2}${execi 2 nvidia-settings -query GPUCoreTemp | grep v-arch | awk 'NR==1 {$0=substr($0,1,length($0)-1); print $4}'}\
 ${iconv_start UTF-8 ISO_8859-1}° ${iconv_stop}C ${color3}
 Fan Speed ${color2}${execi 2 nvidia-smi -a | grep Fan\ Speed | awk -F':' '{print $2}'}${color3}
 Memory ${color2}${execi 10 nvidia-smi -q -d MEMORY | grep Used | awk -F':' '{print $2}'}${color3} \
| ${color2}${execi 10 nvidia-smi -q -d MEMORY | grep Total | awk -F':' '{print $2}'}${color3} \
| ${color2}${execi 10 nvidia-smi -q -d MEMORY | grep Free | awk -F':' '{print $2}'}${color3}
 Memory Freq ${color2}${execi 10 nvidia-settings -query GPUCurrentClockFreqs | grep v-arch | awk -F':' 'NR==1{ print $3}' | awk -F',' '{$2=substr($2,1,length($2)-1); print $2}'} Mhz${color3}

${template5 FILESYSTEMS}
${template4 /}
${template4 /home}
${template4 /mnt/storage}
${template4 /mnt/games}
${template4 /tmp}


Watch the video tutorial for more explanation :




If you have encountered a problem or you have any questions or remarks please feel free to set a comment.
 
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